A DEFENCE OF SOUTHERN SLAVERY. AGAINST THE ATTACKS OF HENRY CLAY AND ALEX'R. CAMPBELL. IN WHICH MUCH OF THE FALSE PHILANTHROPY AND MAWKISH SENTIMENTALISM OF THE ABOLITIONISTS IS MET AND REFUTED. IN WHICH IT IS MOREOVER SHOWN THAT THE ASSOCIATION OF THE WHITE AND BLACK RACES IN THE RELATION OF MASTER AND SLAVE IS THE APPOINTED ORDER OF GOD....By a Southern Clergyman.

Hamburg, S.C. Printed by Robinson and Carlisle, 1851. 46,[2]pp. including appendix. Gathered signatures, stitched as issued. Text tanned, light scattered foxing, offsetting from text throughout. Very good. Partially unopened. Item #WRCAM62831

An impassioned defense of Southern slavery, written by a Southern clergyman in response to Henry Clay, Alexander Campbell, and what the author calls their "combined effort to destroy the Institution of slavery." The author, Iveson Lewis Brookes (1793–1865) was a Baptist minister, planter, and Southern sectionalist. Born in North Carolina, Brookes attended the University of North Carolina where he delivered a commencement address that - in its anti-slavery sentiments - would seem to run contrary to his later position on the subject. After graduating, Brookes went on to become a Baptist minister, settling first in Georgia and then on an estate in Woodville, South Carolina. Despite his early opposition to slavery, Brookes amassed through three marriages over the course of his lifetime "a vast network of plantations and gangs of slaves," becoming "a staunch defender of slavery and a rabid southern sectionalist" and publishing "dozens of defenses of slavery, most of them in the form of letters to northern antislavery periodicals" (Tise).

The present pamphlet was among the most famous of these. It consists of two reviews, one in response to Henry Clay's "Letter on Emancipation" and the other to Alexander Campbell's "Tract for the People of Kentucky." Both reviews were written for periodicals in 1849, but only the first saw publication that year, making the inclusion of the review of Campbell in this 1851 publication its first appearance in print. Writing of the abolitionists' "mad disregard of the Bible and the American Constitution" and of "their threatened onslaught upon Southern rights and institutions," Brookes hoped that his Defence of Southern Slavery would "assist Southerners to form correct views of their rights, and of the rectitude of their Institution as appointed of God and sustained by the Bible." Brookes died on March 30, 1865, just ten days before Lee's surrender at Appomattox Courthouse.

Described by historian Larry Edward Tise as among "the most characteristic statements of a die-hard southern sectionalist who had learned to love the life of a slaveholding planter." A disturbing - but nevertheless revealing - example of the pro-slavery Christianity that came to dominate the ideological landscape of the antebellum American South. HOWES B811. SABIN 81954. WORK, p.314. BLOCKSON 9351. Larry Edward Tise, "Brookes, Iveson Lewis" in Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, Volume 1, A-C, ed. William S. Powell (Chapel Hill. 1979), pp.234-35.

Price: $300.00