OBSERVATIONS ON THE IMPORTANCE OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION, AND THE MEANS OF MAKING IT A BENEFIT TO THE WORLD. TO WHICH IS ADDED, A LETTER FROM M. TURGOT...WITH AN APPENDIX, CONTAINING A TRANSLATION OF THE WILL OF M. FORTUNE RICARD, LATELY PUBLISHED IN FRANCE.

Dublin: Printed for L. White, W. Whitestone, P. Byrne, P. Wogan, J. Cash, and R. Marchbank, 1785. viii,156pp. Later plain blue wrappers. Wrappers a bit soiled. Scattered foxing. Very good. Item #WRCAM57507

Dublin printing of the second, expanded, and best edition of this important British pamphlet in support of America's newfound independence, "a revolution which opens a new prospect in human affairs and begins a new era in the history of mankind." The first half of Price's OBSERVATIONS consists of advice to the fledgling United States. He foresees the struggles stemming from Congress's lack of central authority, and after sharing his thoughts on various concepts such as freedom of speech and education ends his suggestions with a harsh remonstration of slavery. "The Negro Trade cannot be censured in language too severe," he writes, "It is a traffic which, as it has been hitherto carried on, is shocking to humanity, cruel, wicked, and diabolical." Price states his pleasure that the United States are "entering into measures for discountenancing it," for "Till they have done this, it will not appear they deserve the liberty for which they have been contending." He recognizes that it will take time, but sternly notes that "nothing can excuse the United States if it is not done with as much speed, and at the same time with as much effect, as their particular circumstances and situation will allow." The latter half of the work consists of a side-by- side translation of various letters written by French Comptroller General Turgot on the subject of America.

Richard Price was an influential Welsh philosopher and political reformer, and his circle of contacts included Jefferson, Adams, Washington, Turgot, and many other figures of the day. He was a staunch ally of the American and French Revolutions, and in 1778 was even given an offer to travel to the states to work for the Continental Congress. "Price, intimate friend of Franklin, was the most influential British advocate of American independence" - Howes.
HOWES P585. SABIN 65450. ESTC T13186. REESE, FEDERAL HUNDRED 5 (ref).

Price: $600.00