[COLLECTION OF THIRTY-FOUR TREATIES BETWEEN MEXICO AND OTHER NATIONS MADE BETWEEN 1822 AND 1862, INCLUDING IMPORTANT PRINTINGS OF THE GADSDEN PURCHASE TREATY, THE TREATY OF GUADALUPE HIDALGO, AND THE TREATY WITH SPAIN WHICH FORMALLY RECOGNIZED MEXICAN INDEPENDENCE. WITH A TWO PAGE MANUSCRIPT INDEX].

[Various places, see below. 1822-1862]. Various paginations, enumerated below. Most of the treaties are in folio format, with a few (noted below) in octavo. Entire collection bound in a single folio volume of 19th-century three-quarter red calf and marbled boards, spine gilt, raised bands. Boards worn and rubbed, later repairs to corners, joints starting to crack but still strong, spine ends chipped and worn with previous amateur repair to head of spine. Occasional chipping to edges of pages, some foxing, tanning, and occasional light soiling throughout. Bookplate on front pastedown (Colección Monclau), occasional manuscript annotations throughout. Overall very good. In a cloth chemise and half morocco and cloth slipcase, gilt leather labels. Item #WRCAM56932

A fascinating and important collection of Mexican treaties, including eighteen made within the first twenty years of Mexico's independence from Spain, and also including the exceedingly rare Mexican printing of the Gadsden Purchase Treaty, and the official Mexican printing of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, ending the Mexican-American War. In all, the collection charts the progress of Mexican international relations and diplomacy in the first forty-one years after independence and comprises treaties with the United States (ten in all), European powers (nineteen total, including their former mother country, Spain), and other South American nations (five). Although the origin of this volume is unknown, it was quite possibly compiled by a member of the Mexican government or of the Mexican diplomatic corps in the mid-19th century.

As noted, a highlight of the collection is the extremely rare Mexican printing of the Gadsden Purchase Treaty of 1853, by which the United States created its present southwestern border and Mexico gave up parts of what are now present-day southern Arizona and New Mexico. The United States had also pressed for the states of Sonora and Baja California as well, but Mexico did not accede to that demand. The official Mexican printing of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo (one of only 500 copies, according to Palau) is also present. Also included is Mexico's 1823 treaty with Colombia - the first that newly-independent Mexico made with another nation, as well as the 1826 treaty with Great Britain, which was the first Mexican treaty with a European power. Several of the treaties with Britain include articles by which Mexico agrees to end the slave trade. Mexico's treaty with Spain of 1838 - by which Spain formally recognized Mexican independence and made peace with her break- away colony - is included here in the rare official folio edition. Many of the treaties of the 1820s and '30s carry clauses accommodating the relative inequality of Mexican commerce and shipping vis à vis the United States and European powers.

A list of the treaties, conventions, and other documents follows, in the order in which they are bound:

1) [Mexico-German States Treaty]: TRATADO DE AMISTAD, NAVEGACION Y COMERCIO CELEBRADO ENTRE LA REPUBLICA MEXICANA Y LOS REINOS Y ESTADOS GOBERANOS DE ALEMANIA.... [Mexico City. 1856]. [2],14pp. including blank, printed in double columns in Spanish and German Fraktur. Folio. General commercial treaty between Mexico and nineteen German states, including some, such as Prussia and Saxony, with whom treaties already existed, and numerous smaller principalities.

2) [Mexico-Hanseatic League Treaty]: MINISTERIO DE RELACIONES ESTERIORES Y GOBERNACION...UN TRATADO DE AMISTAD, NAVEGACION Y COMERCIO ENTRE ESTA REPÚBLICA Y LAS CIUDADES LIBRES Y ANSEÁTICAS DE LUBECK, BREMEN Y HAMBURGO...[caption title]. [Mexico City. 1842]. 11pp., printed in double columns in Spanish and French. Folio. Commercial treaty between Mexico and the Baltic and the north German ports of Lübeck, Bremen, and Hamburg.

3) [Mexico-Belgium Treaty]: TRATADO DE AMISTAD, NAVEGACION Y COMERCIO CELEBRADO ENTRE LA REPUBLICA MEXICANA Y S.M. EL REY DE LOS BELGAS. [Mexico City. 1862]. 12pp., printed in double columns in Spanish and French. Folio. Commercial treaty between Mexico and Belgium.

4) [Mexico-Sardinia Treaty]: TRATADO DE AMISTAD, NAVEGACION Y COMERCIO, ENTRE LA REPUBLICA MEXICANA Y S.M. EL REY DE CERDEÑA. [Mexico City. 1856]. [2],10pp., printed in double columns in Spanish and Italian. Folio. Commercial treaty with Sardinia, then including northern Italy. PALAU 339396.

5) [Mexico-Chile Treaty]: PRIMERA SECRETARIA DE ESTADO. DEPARTAMENTO DEL ESTERIOR. EL VICE- PRESIDENTE DE LOS ESTADOS-UNIDOS MEXICANOS...UN TRATADO DE AMISTAD, COMERCIO Y NAVEGACION ENTRE LOS ESTADOS-UNIDOS MEXICANOS Y LA REPÚBLICA DE CHILE...[caption title]. [Mexico City. 1833]. [4]pp. Folio. The first Mexican treaty with Chile, and the second with a South American power, after Gran Colombia in 1825. Not in Palau.

6) [Mexico-Colombia Decree]: PRIMERA SECRETARÍA DE ESTADO. NÚM. 21. LA REGENCIA DEL IMPERIO SE HA SERVIDO DIRIGIRME EL DECRETO QUE SIGUE...QUE EL IMPERIO MEXICANO RECONOCE SOLAMENTE Á LA NACION COLOMBIANA EN LA CLASE DE POTENCIA LIBRE É INDEPENDIENTE...[caption title]. [Mexico City. 1822]. [4]pp. including blank. Folio. With manuscript notarial mark next to the printed signature of José Manuel de Herrera, the first Minister of Foreign and Internal Relations for Mexico. Rare decree of the interim Regency government of Mexico recognizing the independent nation of Colombia, soon after both countries gained their independence from Spain. This is likely the first diplomatic document between Mexico and Colombia. The word "solamente" in the title is a typographical error for "solemnemente," with the error corrected here in a contemporary manuscript hand. OCLC 957349639.

7) [Mexico-Colombia Treaty]: PRIMERIA SECRETARIA DE ESTADO. SECCION DE ESTADO. EL PRESIDENTE DE LOS ESTADOS UNIDOS MEXICANOS...[caption title]. [Mexico City. 1825]. [5]pp. Folio. Mexico negotiated a treaty of amity and commerce with the new republic of Colombia in the fall of 1823, but it was not ratified until September 20, 1825, and printed immediately thereafter. This is the first treaty between Mexico and another power, and probably the first treaty of Gran Colombia as well (which then encompassed Ecuador and Venezuela as well as Colombia).

8) [Mexico-Colombia Decree]: PRIMERA SECRETARÍA DE ESTADO. LA REGENCIA DEL IMPERIO SE HA SERVIDO DIRIGIRME EL DECRETO QUE SIGUE...[caption title]. [Mexico City. 1822]. [4]pp. including blank. Folio. With manuscript notarial mark next to the printed signature of José Manuel de Herrera. Additional decree ordering formal ceremonies and an artillery salute to Colombia's independence, set forth in number 6 above.

9) [Mexico-Denmark Treaty]: PRIMERA SECRETARIA DE ESTADO. DEPARTAMENTO DEL ESTERIOR...UN TRATADO DE AMISTAD, NAVEGACION Y COMERCIO ENTRE LOS ESTADOS-UNIDOS MEXICANOS Y SU MAGESTAD EL REY DE DINAMARCA...[caption title]. [Mexico City. 1829]. [9]pp., printed in double columns in Spanish and French. Folio. This treaty of amity and commerce with Denmark was negotiated in 1828 and ratified in 1829.

10) [Mexico-Spain Treaty]: TRATADO DEFINITIVO DE PAZ Y AMISTAD ENTRE LA REPUBLICA MEXICANA Y S.M. CATOLICA. [Mexico City. 1838]. [7]pp. Folio. Certainly the most important Mexican treaty before Guadalupe Hidalgo, this treaty with Spain officially recognized that Mexico was now independent from the mother country, established peace between the two countries (they had technically been at war since the Revolution), agreed to conclude treaties on claims and commerce, and settled other differences. This official folio printing is not in Palau, who notes only a quarto printing of 1843. PALAU 339375 (another Mexico printing).

11) [Mexico-Spain Treaty]: SECRETARIA DE ESTADO Y DEL DESPACHO DE RELACIONES EXTERIORES...UNA CONVENCION ENTRE ESTA REPÚBLICA Y LA ESPAÑA...[caption title]. [Mexico City. 1854]. [5]pp. Folio. With manuscript notarial mark next to the printed signature of Manuel Diez de Bonilla, Secretary of International Relations. This convention, negotiated between 1851 and 1854, sought to settle outstanding differences between Spain and Mexico, mainly relating to claims and commercial problems.

12) [Mexico-Spain Treaty]: TRATADO CONCLUIDO EN PARIS EL 26 DE SETIEMBRE DE 1859, PARA PONER TÉRMINO Á LAS DIFERENCIAS QUE EXISTIAN ENTRE MÉXICO Y ESPAÑA. [Mexico City. 1859]. [8]pp. including blank. Folio. A circular issued by the Ministry of International Relations to ministers throughout the Americas and Europe, explaining the treaty recently concluded between Mexico and Spain.

13) [Mexico-Spain Decree]: SECRETARIA DE ESTADO Y DEL DESPACHO DE RELACIONES EXTERIORES...MIGUEL MIRAMON, GENERAL DE DIVISION Y EN GEFE DEL EJÉRCITO NACIONAL, Y PRESIDENTE SUSTITUTO DE LA REPÚBLICA MEXICANA, Á TODOS LOS QUE LAS PRESENTES VIEREN, SABED...[caption title]. [Mexico City. 1860]. [6]pp. including blank. Folio. With manuscript notarial mark next to the printed signature of Octaviano Muñoz Ledo, Interim Minister of International Relations. Decree ordered by Miguel Miramon, briefly president of the conservative region following the War of Reform, explaining the Mon-Almonte treaty recently signed by Spain with Mexican conservatives as they sought support in their struggle against liberal forces.

14) [Mexico-United States Treaty]: PRIMERA SECRETARIA DE ESTADO. DEPARTAMENTO DEL ESTERIOR...UN TRATADO PARA LA DEMARCACION DE LOS LIMÍTES...[caption title]. [Mexico City. 1832]. 5pp., printed in double columns in Spanish and English. Folio. This brief treaty adds an extension to the 1828 treaty of limits, which contained a deadline on ratification, so as to allow its passage with the amity and commerce treaty. Like the 1828 treaty and the amity and commerce treaty, it was ratified in Mexico on December 1, 1832. MALLOY, p.1084.

15) [Mexico-United States Treaty]: PRIMERA SECRETARIA DE ESTADO. DEPARTAMENTO DEL ESTERIOR. EL ESCMO. SR. PRESIDENTE...EL DECRETO...UN TRATADO DE AMISTAD, COMERCIO Y NAVEGACION ENTRE LOS ESTADOS UNIDOS MEXICANOS Y LOS ESTADOS UNIDOS DE AMÉRICA...[caption title]. [Mexico City. 1832]. 21pp., printed in double columns in Spanish and English. Folio. This is the second treaty between Mexico and the United States, negotiated in 1831 and ratified in Mexico on December 1, 1832. The Mexican government had refused to sign a treaty of amity and commerce until a boundary treaty had been concluded, and that treaty, negotiated in 1828, was ratified the same day. The clauses were fairly standard for such a commercial treaty, with the interesting addition of a clause by which the powers agreed not to incite hostile Indians to attack each other. Since Texas was then a part of Mexico, this treaty applied to trade with Texas as well, but Streeter fails to note a Mexican printing of the treaty, only listing the Congressional printing. MALLOY, p.1085. PALAU 339368.

16) [Mexico-United States Treaty]: PRIMERA SECRETARIA DE ESTADO, DEPARTAMENTO DE EXTERIOR...QUE Á EFECTO DE FACILITAR EL CUMPLIMIENIO DEL ART. 3.° DEL TRATADO DE LÍMITES ENTRE ESTOS ESTADOS Y LOS UNIDOS DEL NORTE AMÉRICA...[caption title]. [Mexico City. 1836]. [4]pp., printed in double columns in Spanish and English. Folio. By this treaty, negotiated in 1835, the United States and Mexico added a clause to the 1828 treaty of limits, agreeing to commissioners meeting to survey the boundary of the U.S. and Mexico, especially along the Sabine River. By the time this was ratified the point was moot; Texas had seized independence and the Sabine boundary no longer existed. The day set for ratification was, in fact, the same day as the Battle of San Jacinto. MALLOY, p.1099. STREETER TEXAS 1257a.

17) [Mexico-United States Treaty]: MINISTERIO DE RELACIONES ESTERIORES...CONVENCION PARA EL ARREGLO DE RECLAMACIONES DE CIUDADANOS DE LOS ESTADOS- UNIDOS DE AMÉRICA, CONTRA EL GOBIERNO DE LA REPÚBLICA MEXICANA...[caption title]. [Mexico City. 1840]. [4]pp., printed in double columns in Spanish and English. Folio. This treaty, the fifth chronologically between Mexico and the United States, attempted to set up a structure for settling claims of citizens. Many U.S. traders in Mexico had claims there, and many Mexicans who had lost property in the Texas Revolution now made claims against the U.S. These nagging problems received no real settlement here. MALLOY, p.1101.

18) [Mexico-United States Treaty]: TRATADO DE PAZ, AMISTAD, LIMITES Y ARREGLO DEFINITIVO ENTRE LA REPUBLICA MEXICANA Y LOS ESTADOS- UNIDOS DE AMERICA...[second titlepage, in English:] TREATY OF PEACE, FRIENDSHIP, BOUNDARIES, AND DEFINITIVE SETTLEMENT BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND THE MEXICAN REPUBLIC.... Mexico City: I. Cumplido, 1848. 55pp., printed in Spanish and English on facing pages. The official Mexican printing of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, ending the war of 1846-48 between the United States and Mexico, and resulting in the formal cession of the entire Southwest and California to the United States. Agreements were reached for the withdrawal of American troops from Mexico, the payment of Mexican claims, and the formal cession of territory (the U.S. had already occupied all of the land). The theoretical boundaries were set out and arrangements for boundary commissioners were made. By this treaty the U.S. made an addition of land only equalled by the Louisiana Purchase and the Alaska Purchase. An important American treaty, here in a scarce printing (only 500 copies, according to Palau). MALLOY, p.1107. PALAU 339389. STREETER SALE 282.

19) [Mexico-United States Treaty]: TRATADO DE PAZ, AMISTAD, LÍMITES Y ARREGLO DEFINITIVO ENTRE LA REPÚBLICA MEXICANA Y LOS ESTADOS- UNIDOS DE AMÉRICA, FIRMADO EN GUADALUPE HIDALGO EL 2 DE FEBRERO DE 1848, CON LAS MODIFICACIONES CON QUE HA SIDO APROBADO POR EL SENADO, Y RATIFICADO POR EL PRESIDENTE DE LOS ESTADOS-UNIDOS. Querétaro: J.M. Lara, 1848. 28pp., printed in double columns in Spanish and English. Quarto. Partially unopened and untrimmed. "This is the text of the treaty as signed at Querétaro 2 February 1848" (Streeter) before final ratification. President Polk sent the treaty to the Senate on February 22, and after several amendments, they approved it on March 10. The final treaty, ratified by Mexico, is item 18 in this list. HOWES M565. COWAN II, 252. PALAU 339388. STREETER SALE 281.

20) [Mexico-United States Treaty]: EXPOSICION DIRIGIDA AL SUPREMO GOBIERNO POR LOS SENORES COMISIONADOS QUE FIRMARON EL TRATADO DE PAZ CON LOS ESTADOS-UNIDOS. Querétaro: J.M. Lara, 1848. 27pp. Quarto. Unopened and untrimmed. According to Streeter, this is part of item 19 above. Although it has a separate imprint, it has continuous signatures with the TRATADO. The text is written by the Mexican signatories, defending their cession of California and New Mexico to the United States and discussing the new boundary with the U.S.; it also includes instructions for the Mexican boundary commissioners. STREETER SALE 281 (ref.).

21) [Mexico-United States Treaty]: SECRETARIO DE ESTADO Y DEL DESPACHO RELACIONES EXTERIORES...UN TRATADO ENTRE LA REPÚBLICA MEJICANA Y LOS ESTADOS-UNIDOS DE AMÉRICA...[caption title]. [Mexico City. 1854]. [8]pp., printed in double columns in Spanish and English. Folio. The extremely rare official printing of the Gadsden Purchase Treaty, agreed to on December 30, 1853, and ratified the following year. By this agreement the United States purchased what is now the southern part of the states of Arizona and New Mexico, thus securing the land needed for the southern route of the transcontinental railroad. The main U.S. negotiator, James Gadsden, had attempted to buy Baja California and Sonora as well, but was rebuffed. This was the last addition to the land mass of the continental United States, and the eighth treaty chronologically with Mexico. MALLOY, p.1121.

22) [Mexico-United States Convention]: MINISTERIO DE RELACIONES EXTERIORES...UNA CONVENCION POSTAL ENTRE LOS ESTADOS-UNIDOS MEXICANOS Y ESTADOS-UNIDOS DE AMÉRICA... [caption title]. [Mexico City. 1862]. [8]pp. including final blank, printed in double columns in Spanish and English. Folio. Decree announcing a formal postal convention between Mexico and the U.S.

23) [Mexico-United States Treaty]: MINISTERIO DE RELACIONES EXTERIORES...UN TRATADO DE EXTRADICION ENTRE LOS ESTADOS- UNIDOS MEXICANOS Y ESTADOS-UNIDOS DE AMÉRICA...[caption title]. [Mexico City. 1862]. [4]pp., printed in double columns in Spanish and English. Folio. Extradition treaty between the U.S. and Mexico, providing for the return of criminals to their respective countries. Notably, Article V stipulates that the treaty does not "embrace the return of fugitive slaves, nor the delivery of criminals who, when the offence was committed, shall have been held in the place where the offence was committed in the condition of slaves, the same being expressly forbidden by the Constitution of Mexico...."

24) [Mexico-France Treaty]: MINISTERIO DE RELACIONES ESTERIORES. EL ESCMO. SR. PRESIDENTE...UN TRATADO DE PAZ ENTRE ESTA REPÚBLICA Y EL REINO DE FRANCIA...[caption title]. [Mexico City. 1840]. [3]pp., printed in double columns in Spanish and French. Folio. This peace treaty ended the so-called "Pastry War" between France and Mexico. The French had blockaded the main Mexican port of Vera Cruz in an attempt to collect claims due French citizens. After landing troops, an agreement was negotiated and the French withdrew.

25) [Mexico-France Treaty]: MINISTERIO DE RELACIONES EXTERIORES. EL ESCMO. SR. PRESIDENTE...UNA CONVENCION ENTRE ESTA REPÚBLICA Y EL REINO DE FRANCIA...[caption title]. [Mexico City. 1840]. [3]pp., printed in double columns in Spanish and French. Folio. A convention for the settlement of claims which had prompted the French blockade of Vera Cruz.

26) [Mexico-Hanover Treaty]: PRIMERA SECRETARIA DE ESTADO. DEPARTAMENTO DEL ESTERIOR...UN TRATADO DE AMISTAD, NAVEGACION Y COMERCIO ENTRE LOS ESTADOS-UNIDOS MEXICANOS Y SU MAGESTAD EL REY DE HANNOVER [sic]...[caption title]. [Mexico City. 1829]. 15pp., printed in double columns in Spanish and French and in Spanish and English. Folio. Mexico's campaign to establish good relations with the major European powers continued with this treaty with a major German state, agreed to in 1828 and ratified the same day as the Denmark treaty, October 29, 1829. Only the first two pages (in Spanish and French) relate directly to Hanover, the rest being taken up by a printing of the Mexican treaty with Great Britain of 1826 (item 27, below). Logical, if one remembers that the British monarch, George IV, was also the King of Hanover at the time.

27 [Mexico-Great Britain Treaty]: PRIMERA SECRETARIA DE ESTADO, DEPARTMENTO DEL EXTERIOR...UN TRATADO DE AMISTAD, COMERCIO Y NAVEGACION, CON DOS ARTÍCULOS ADICIONALES ENTRE LOS ESTADOS UNIDOS MEXICANOS Y SU MAGESTAD EL REY DEL REINO UNIDO DE LA GRAN BRETAÑA É IRLANDE...[caption title]. [Mexico City. 1827]. 12pp., printed in double columns in Spanish and English. Folio. The first treaty between Mexico and a European power, this amity and commerce treaty was negotiated in London in December of 1826 and ratified in Mexico on October 29, 1827. This was a significant diplomatic victory for England, which was embroiled in Caribbean trade disputes with the United States (John Quincy Adams closed American ports to British shipping from Caribbean colonies the following year). The U.S. still lacked a treaty with Mexico at this point, and this insinuated British influence against American expansion.

28) [Mexico-Great Britain Treaty]: TRATADO PARA LA ABOLICION DEL TRÁFICO DE ESCLAVOS, CELEBRADO ENTRE LA REPÚBLICA MEXICANA Y S.M. BRITÁNICA. [Mexico City. 1843]. [2],18pp., printed in double columns in Spanish and English. Folio. Part of England's crusade against the slave trade, this treaty was agreed to in 1841 and ratified in 1843. Mexico had outlawed slavery upon gaining independence.

29) [Mexico-Great Britain Treaty]: SUPLEMENTO AL NUM. 318 DEL SIGLO XIX...OFICIAL. MINISTERIO DE RELACIONES...CONVENTION BETWEEN HER BRITANNICK MAJESTY AND THE REPUBLICK OF MEXICO, FOR THE SETTLEMENT OF VARIOUS QUESTIONS NOW PENDING BETWEEN THE TWO GOVERNMENTS...[caption title]. [Mexico City. 1861]. Broadside 23 1/2 x 14 3/4 inches, printed on both sides in five columns in Spanish and English. Folded. A circular summarizing additional articles related to Mexican debt repayment to Britain following the Convention of London, which had been signed the previous month.

30) [Mexico-Great Britain Treaty]: ALCANCE AL NUMERO 1793 DE EL HERALDO...CONVENTION BETWEEN HER BRITANIC MAJESTY AND THE REPUBLIC OF MEXICO FOR THE SETTLEMENT OF VARIOUS QUESTIONS NOW PENDING BETWEEN THE TWO GOVERNMENTS...[caption title]. [Mexico City. 1861]. Broadside 24 1/4 x 17 inches, printed on both sides in five columns in Spanish and English. Folded. Another printing of the preceding debt arrangement.

31) [Mexico-Netherlands Treaty]: PRIMERA SECRETARIA DE ESTADO. DEPARTAMENTO DEL EXTERIOR...UN TRATADO DE AMISTAD, NAVEGACION Y COMERCIO CON UN ARTÍCULO ADICIONAL ENTRE LOS ESTADOS-UNIDOS MEXICANOS Y SU MAGESTAD EL REY DE LOS PAISES BAJOS...[caption title]. [Mexico City. 1829]. 9pp., printed in double columns in Spanish and Dutch. Folio. Treaty of amity and commerce between Mexico and the Netherlands, negotiated in 1827 and ratified in 1829, the second treaty between Mexico and a European power.

32) [Mexico-Peru Treaty]: PRIMERA SECRETARIA DE ESTADO. DEPARTAMENTO DEL ESTERIOR...UN TRATADO DE AMISTAD, COMERCIO Y NAVEGACION, ENTRE LOS ESTADOS-UNIDOS MEXICANOS Y LA REPÚBLICA DEL PERÚ...[caption title]. [Mexico City. 1833]. [5]pp. Folio. With manuscript notarial mark next to Foreign Minister Carlos García's printed signature. The first Mexican treaty with Peru, and the third with a South American power, following closely on the heels of the Chile treaty, being ratified on November 20, 1833. This was very shortly after independence was gained from the Spanish, and Peru still included Bolivia. PALAU 339369.

33) PRIMERA SECRETARIA DE ESTADO. DEPARTAMENTO DEL ESTERIOR...UN TRATADO DE AMISTAD, NAVEGACION Y COMERCIO ENTRE LOS ESTADOS-UNIDOS MEXICANOS Y S.M. EL REY DE PRUSIA...[caption title]. [Mexico City. 1836]. 11pp. Printed double columns in French and Spanish. Folio. With manuscript notarial mark next to Foreign Minister José Maria Ortiz Monasterio's printed signature. Treaty between Mexico and the most important of the German states, ratified on April 16, 1836.

34) [Mexico-Saxony Treaty]: PRIMERA SECRETARIA DE ESTADO. DEPARTAMENTO DEL ESTERIOR...UN TRATADO DE AMISTAD Y COMERCIO ENTRE LOS ESTADOS-UNIDOS MEXICANOS Y S.M. EL REY DE SAJONIA...[caption title]. [Mexico City. 1833]. [5]pp., printed in double columns in Spanish and French. Folio. Another early Mexican treaty with the German state of Saxony, following Hanover in 1829. As with that treaty, the formal signatory was the British king (in this instance William IV), who was descended from the House of Hanover.

A remarkable and extensive collection of treaties between Mexico and the United States and powers in Europe and South America, recording the end of the Mexican-American War, settling the southwestern boundary of the United States with Mexico, addressing the issue of the slave trade, and a host of other diplomatic issues and concerns confronting Mexico in the decades following independence from Spain.

Price: $48,500.00