HISTORY OF THE POLICE AND FIRE DEPARTMENTS OF THE CITY OF SEATTLE. THE CITY AND COUNTY OFFICIALS, THE OLD VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT AND THE CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSIONERS.

Seattle: The Lumbermen's Printing Co., 1907. 291,[1]pp. Profusely illustrated with photographic portraits. Original maroon cloth, front board gilt. Minor edge wear, some rubbing to boards. Later bookplate of Seattle collector Ben A. Maslan on front pastedown, early ownership signature on verso of frontispiece. Occasional light thumb-soiling to outer margin. Very good. Item #WRCAM55979

An early photographically-illustrated history of the Seattle police and fire departments, compiled by Dorothy Miller Kahlo, a local "newspaperwoman." The text contains a history of Seattle itself, listings of city officials beginning in 1869, biographies of the current City Council, the officials of the police court, a chapter on famous cases from the area, a chapter on the police chiefs who have served Seattle, a section on Seattle's "Fly Cops," current rosters of both the police and fire departments, a history of the city's fire department, and much more on the various divisions within the police and fire departments. The whole is illustrated with many hundreds of portraits of city officials, police officers, firemen, along with a handful of full-page photographic illustrations showing various squads or police or fire vehicles. Seattle Mayor William Hickman Moore is pictured as the frontispiece.

Among the few hundred biographies and portraits of men in the book are three women. The first is Mrs. M.J. Kelly, the "Seattle Police Matron," who is described as "one of the best-loved members of the police force of Seattle" who "has to take into her home - the city has no other place - all the girls and women who are entitled to the least leniency after being arrested and brought to jail." Mrs. Kelly also looks after the "runaway children, or children detained by the police for any offense, also the children brought in by the truant officer." The second is Mrs. Susan E. Stine, the "Depot Matron" of Union Station and the King Street Depot. Stine's duties include watching out for "unattended girls who might possibly stray into the hands of men or women who are looking for just such opportunities for luring away attractive young women" and "children who happen to get straying away from their guardians...." The third woman pictured in the book is its compiler, Dorothy Miller Kahlo. Her portrait appears on the last page above a biographical note reading: "Dorothy Miller Kahlo is a 'tramp' newspaperwoman - not journalist - occasionally breaks out into print in magazines and compiled this most excellent history with much labor."

A rare and early photographically illustrated work on Seattle first responders. OCLC records a total of ten copies over two records.
SOLIDAY II:664. OCLC 18240638, 866126255.

Price: $1,000.00