THE REFORMED GAMBLER; OR, THE HISTORY OF THE LATER YEARS OF THE LIFE OF JONATHAN H. GREEN.

Philadelphia: T.B. Peterson and Brothers, [1858]. 259pp. plus 17(i.e., 19),[9]pp. of advertisements and advertisements on front and rear endpapers. Frontis. Publisher's blindstamped and gilt pictorial red cloth, spine gilt. Cloth a bit soiled, corners bumped, foredge of rear board scuffed, spine ends chipped. Frontispiece and titlepage browned, otherwise minimal foxing. About very good. Item #WRCAM54987

Jonathan H. Green was one of most successful gamblers in the country until 1842, when he resolved to reform himself, stop gambling, destroy his "gambling implements," and devote himself to ending gaming and gambling throughout the United States. From then, he became the most important figure in the early literature of American gambling, publishing many works, like this one, in which he explains his path out of vice to virtue, and the subsequent work he did to combat gambling and expose crime, cheating, and vice. Intentionally or not, his writing on cheating and tricks is quite detailed and proved popular among active gamblers as well. In fact, the titlepage of the present work explains that it contains "a complete and full exposition" of a number of games, including "thimbles," "diamond cut diamond," "the post office game," "grab loo," and others. Green also wrote several reports on gaming as an agent of the New York Association for the Suppression of Gambling. He led investigations and toured regularly as a speaker. Despite his contemporary popularity, his works are now relatively uncommon. JESSEL 667.

Price: $750.00