[AUTOGRAPH NOTE, SIGNED, BY SUSAN B. ANTHONY, WRITING ABOUT THE "CROWNING RIGHT OF CITIZENSHIP - THE RIGHT TO VOTE"].

Rochester, N.Y. July 22, 1900. [1]p. Likely clipped from a larger sheet of paper for display in an album, pasted to card stock along top and bottom horizontal edges, minor toning. Very good. Item #WRCAM54811

A brief but punchy autograph note, signed by the legendary women's suffrage leader and social reformer. Susan B. Anthony first came to prominence in the early 1850s as she grew increasingly more involved with the women's suffrage movement. Her defining act in her adopted hometown of Rochester came in 1872 when she was arrested after registering for and then casting a vote in the presidential election. The resulting trial saw Anthony convicted of illegally voting, and she was ordered to pay a $100 fine for her "crime." She never paid the fine, nor was she penalized further for refusing to do so. Six years later, Anthony and her close friend and fellow activist Elizabeth Cady Stanton convinced a California Senator, Aaron Sargent, to introduce a constitutional amendment granting women the right to vote. The amendment, which came to be known as the Susan B. Anthony Amendment would not be ratified until 1920 as the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution. Here, at eighty years of age, Anthony responds to an unknown male recipient: "Yes indeed - my Dear Sir - you shall have my pen-tracks - and also my hope that you both believe in & work for the protection of women in the crowning right of citizenship - the right to vote. Very sincerely yours Susan B. Anthony Rochester, N.Y. July 22, 1900." Sadly, Anthony would not live to exercise her franchise right. She passed away in 1906 after battling heart failure and pneumonia - and a lifetime of injustice.

Price: $2,750.00

Susan B. Anthony Encourages a Male Correspondent to Support the Vote for Women