LETTERS FROM JOHN QUINCY ADAMS TO HIS CONSTITUENTS OF THE TWELFTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT IN MASSACHUSETTS. TO WHICH IS ADDED HIS SPEECH IN CONGRESS, DELIVERED FEBRUARY 9, 1837.

Boston: Isaac Knapp, 1837. 72pp. Stitched as issued. Light scattered foxing. Very gooD. In a half morocco box. Item #WRCAM54137

After his bitter defeat in the 1828 presidential election, John Quincy Adams retired to Quincy, Massachuetts but soon responded to his constituents' call by serving as their Representative in Congress, commencing his greatest years in a long career of public service. These LETTERS chronicle his fight against the Gag Rule, authored by the South Carolinian Henry Pinckney. The House would table any petitions "relating in any way to the subject of slavery, or the abolition of slavery...without being either printed or referred." In his introductory remarks here, John Greenleaf Whittier credits Adams with "the powerful and triumphant vindication of the Right to Petition." Moreover, his efforts to repeal the Gag Rule exposed "the graphic delineation of the Slavery spirit in Congress, and the humbling disclosure of northern cowardice and treachery." Whittier's poems "Lines written on the Passage of Mr. Pinckney's Resolutions" and "Stanzas for the Times" are printed on pages 66-72. DUMOND 4.

Price: $2,250.00