[AUTOGRAPH LETTER, SIGNED, FROM JOHN QUINCY ADAMS TO JOSEPH BLUNT, REFUSING A REQUEST TO WRITE A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF HIS FATHER, AND SOLICITING INFORMATION ABOUT ELECTIONEERING IN ALBANY].

Washington. March 20, 1827. [1]p. Previously folded, separated along horizontal center fold, with smaller separations at lower edge. Previously mounted, with strip of mounting material along upper edge. Tape repairs to lower corners. Lower three quarters tanned. Fair. Item #WRCAM52532

A letter from the beginning of John Quincy Adams' third year in the White House. He writes to his acquaintance Joseph Blunt, informing him that he is unable to provide biographical information about his father, and wishes him luck on his publication project: "[I] am glad to learn that your projected publication of an annual Register is so far advanced - It would give me great pleasure to furnish you with the biographical minutes relating to my deceased father, but I cannot undertake it, for various considerations upon which it is not necessary for me to enlarge....I hope the profits of your work may indemnify you for the trouble you have taken in compiling it, and would not discourage you by the ill success of all former attempts of the same kind." Blunt published the ANNUAL AMERICAN REGISTER, a compendium of information about history, significant figures, politics, and current events in the late 1820s and early 1830s. The elder Adams had died on July 4 of the previous year. The second part of the letter solicits opinions regarding "electioneering" in Albany, in reference to the 1827 state election for the U.S. Senate in which Martin Van Buren defeated Stephen Van Rensselaer, though Adams is reluctant to divulge his opinion on the matter: "I write no Letters upon what is called Politics - that is, electioneering - But I listen with interest to whatever my friends have to say upon topics of public concern. If any of them are dissatisfied, it would be a good Office of friendship in them not only to say so, but to specify the cause of their dissatisfaction, and to point out the means if any by which it might be removed. Not less friendly would it be in them, thinking I have been deceived by some in whom I have placed confidence, to indicate the supposed deceivers, and the errors into which I have been led by trusting them." Adams maintained an interest in the outcome since Van Rensselaer supported him in the House of Representatives during the disputed 1824 presidential election and Van Buren was a proponent of Andrew Jackson. A reserved but quite interesting letter from the second President Adams.

Price: $2,500.00

Refusing to Write about His Father