WHAT DO THE PANTHERS STAND FOR....THE PEOPLE CHARGE YALE WITH COMPLICITY IN THE FRAME-UP OF THE NEW HAVEN 9. [caption title].

New York. 1970. [8]pp. Folio. Previously folded. Tanned. About very good. Item #WRCAM52278

An informational newspaper published by the Committee to Defend the Panther 21 that broadly states the goals of the Black Panther movement, and prints a long letter on the unfairness of the charges against the Panthers, addressed to the judge in charge, John Murtagh. The Panther 21 were accused of conspiring to kill police officers and bomb a number of buildings in New York City in 1970. Though at the time the trial was the longest and the costliest in the history of the state of New York, the twenty-one accused were acquitted on all charges. The newspaper was also printed in the context of the Black Panther trials that were occurring at the same time in New Haven, Ct., where nine Panthers were charged with involvement in the murder of one of their members, Alex Rackley, who had been suspected of being an FBI informant. The back page of the paper publicizes a three- day event for the beginning of May to protest the trial, with a headline that reads "The People Charge Yale with Complicity in the Frame-up of the New Haven 9." The program from the boasted speeches from Artie Seale, wife of Black Panthers president Bobby Seale (who was one of the accused on trial), and French writer Jean Genet, and music performed by Santana. These events led directly to the May Day riots in New Haven on May 1, 1970, the height of student unrest at Yale in the period, famously alluded to my the Doors in their song "Peace Frog": "Blood in the streets of the town of New Haven...."

Price: $750.00

Blood in the Streets in the Town of New Haven...May Day at Yale, 1970