[TWO VOLUMES OF GENERAL ORDERS FROM THE AMERICAN MILITARY GOVERNMENT IN HAVANA DIRECTING STATE AND LOCAL OPERATIONS AFTER THE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR, 1899 - 1900].

Havana. 1899-1900. Approximately [520]; [600]pp., including several folding charts. Over 200 separate imprints. Original half leather and brown cloth boards, spine gilt. Corners and edges worn, spine rubbed, boards scuffed. Initial leaves of first volume torn away but present. Several other leaves chipped and torn throughout. With many official signatures and docketing stamps. Good. Item #WRCAM51843

Two volumes of orders promulgated in 1889 and 1900 by the American military government of Cuba after the cessation of hostilities in the Spanish-American War. Under the terms of the Teller Amendment to the Congressional Joint Resolution for war with Spain in 1898, the United States denied the intention of using the conflict as a pretext for the annexation of Cuba, and promised to leave the island following the termination of the war. The American military, therefore, oversaw the creation of the new independent Cuban government before departing in 1902. The documents contained in this collection consist of over two hundred orders in both English and Spanish from the Headquarters Division of Cuba that helped to shape the emerging civilian government. They include instructions for the running of elections, the organization of the courts and school system, the appointments for various government offices, provisions for tax regulations, and may other critical issues facing Cuba at its independence. The directives cover two periods, from January to July in 1899, and from July to September in 1901. Many of the orders are signed in manuscript by the assistants to the military governor for the island, Gen. Leonard Wood, including assistant adjutant generals J.B. Hickey and L.W.V. Kennon, and Brig. Gen., Chief of Staff Adna R. Chaffee. An interesting documentation of the first American occupation of Cuba.

Price: $5,000.00

The American Military Orders Governing Cuba in the Wake of the Seizure of the Island During the Spanish-American War