REMINISCENCES OF THE TEXAS REPUBLIC. ANNUAL ADDRESS DELIVERED BEFORE THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF GALVESTON.

Galveston, Tx. Published by the Society, 1876. 82pp. Lacks preliminary limitation leaf. Half morocco and marbled boards in antique style, leather label. Scattered pencil annotations. Very good. Item #WRCAM50107

One of 100 copies of the rare first printing of Ashbel Smith's important memoir of Texas diplomacy during the Republic period. "Written by one of the wisest men of early Texas, this is the most astute first-hand account of diplomatic activities leading to annexation. No one, with the exception of Sam Houston and Anson Jones, was more intimately involved in the process of acquiring international recognition of the Republic of Texas and bringing about annexation than Dr. Ashbel Smith....The text is personal but objective, a blended narrative of anecdote and analysis. Smith reviews the Texas border question, the various votes and movements for recognition and annexation in Texas and the United States, his activities in France and England, and the treaties which he negotiated" - Jenkins. Smith was born in Connecticut and educated at Yale, where he also received his medical degree. He became surgeon general of the Army of Texas in 1837, was appointed CHARGÉ D'AFFAIRES to England and France by Sam Houston, and later served as Texas Secretary of State. He provides a careful narrative of the course of Texas diplomacy from 1836 to 1845, covering shifts in mood regarding annexation in both the United States and in Texas, the Republic's relations with the U.S., European nations, and Mexico, and the activities of Texan leaders. "An able work by one of the really great men of the Republic" - Raines. Though reprinted several times, this is the true first edition of this vital firsthand report on the diplomatic activities of the Texas Republic. BASIC TEXAS BOOKS 186. HOWES S574, "aa." RAINES, p.190. RADER 2934. VANDALE TEXIANAMETER 158. EBERSTADT 162:739. SABIN 82346.

Price: $3,500.00

Ashbel Smith's Memoir of Texas Diplomacy