REMARKS OF GENERAL HARRISON, LATE ENVOY EXTRAORDINARY AND MINISTER PLENIPOTENTIARY OF THE UNITED STATES TO THE REPUBLIC OF COLOMBIA, ON CERTAIN CHARGES MADE AGAINST HIM BY THAT GOVERNMENT. TO WHICH IS ADDED, AN UNOFFICIAL LETTER FROM GENERAL HARRISON TO GENERAL BOLIVAR....

Washington. 1830. 69pp. Modern half calf and marbled boards. Light foxing and age toning. Small tears at edges of some leaves, lower corner of two leaves torn away, not affecting text. Good. Item #WRCAM48017

Harrison's defense of his conduct while American ambassador to the new state of Colombia. Harrison was appointed to that post in 1828 through the influence of Henry Clay. He arrived in Bogota in February 1829, quickly decided that Bolivar nursed plans to make himself an emperor, and became far too involved with the faction opposing the President. These interferences were deeply resented by the Colombian government. On Sept. 21, 1829, Harrison received notice that Jackson had replaced him with T.P. Moore, who arrived in Bogota that day. On Sept. 27, Harrison wrote Bolivar a letter of "extraordinary temerity, urging him to adhere to the tenets of republicanism" (DAB). This so upset the Colombians, Harrison was more or less forcibly ejected from the country two weeks later. Despite having acted in a highly inappropriate fashion, Harrison immediately wrote the present work, defending his conduct and publishing his offensive letter to Bolivar. Relatively scarce on the market. The Streeter copy is not a good comparison, since it was one of the copies inscribed by Harrison, and hence much more valuable. Seven Gables bought it on behalf of Victor Jacobs, and it reappeared at auction in 1996, selling to a private collector. It reappeared in that collector's 2013 sale at Sotheby's, where it sold for $22,500 to Stephen Massey, bidding for a collector. DAB VIII, pp.350-51. STREETER SALE 1740.

Price: $1,000.00