NARRATIVE OF THE CAPTIVITY OF WILLIAM BIGGS AMONG THE KICKAPOO INDIANS IN ILLINOIS IN 1788.

[New York]. 1922. 36pp. Original grey paper boards, printed paper label on front board. Bookplate on front pastedown. Very minor shelfwear, else fine. Item #WRCAM47513

Number 37 in Heartman's Historical Series, one of only eighty-one copies printed on regular paper (plus another five on Japan paper). This is the second edition following the tremendously rare Edwardsville 1826 edition. William Biggs (1755-1827) was born in Maryland and served with George Rogers Clark in the Illinois country during the American Revolution. In 1784 he settled in Bellefontaine, Illinois and became engaged in transporting beaver skins in southern Illinois. In March, 1788, he and a companion were attacked by Kickapoo Indians. Biggs' horse was shot from under him and instead of running from the Indians he turned to resist and confront them. The Kickapoo did not kill him, taking him captive instead: "[they] said they were Kickapoos, and that they were very good Indians, and I need not be afraid they would not hurt me, and that I was now a Kickapoo and must go with them." He was taken to a Kickapoo settlement on the Wabash River and spent about six weeks with his captors, travelling to various settlements before finally buying his release (with the aid of some traders) for 130 buckskins, about $260 in silver. "A captivity relation of special interest for its account of southern Illinois in the first two years of American occupation" - Howes. AYER (SUPPLEMENT) 14. HOWES B442.

Price: $225.00