THE APPEAL TO THE PUBLIC ANSWERED, IN BEHALF OF THE NON-EPISCOPAL CHURCHES IN AMERICA; CONTAINING REMARKS ON WHAT DR. THOMAS BRADBURY CHANDLER HAS ADVANCED....WHEREIN THE REASONS FOR AN AMERICAN EPISCOPATE ARE SHEWN TO BE INSUFFICIENT, AND THE OBJECTIONS AGAINST IT IN FULL FORCE.

Boston: Printed by Kneeland and Adams, 1768. 205,[1]pp. Half title. Modern blue cloth, spine gilt. Light, even tanning. Very good. Item #WRCAM47437

Inscribed on the half title, almost certainly from Chauncy: "To the Hon. William Smith Jun. Esq. in New York." William Smith, Jr. was a prominent New York lawyer and son of the jurist and historian of New York, William Smith.

Growing political tensions between the colonies and the crown in the 1760s were mirrored in the views held toward the Anglican church in America. Patriots saw those who were high in the church as harboring Loyalist tendencies and viewed them with suspicion. Presbyterians and Congregationalists were also wary of the power of the Anglican church, and feared attempts to establish the dominance of the Church of England in America. In 1767, Thomas Bradbury Chandler, the rector of St. John's Church in Elizabethtown, New Jersey, called for the appointment of a resident bishop and sparked a pamphlet war over the issue, of which Chauncy's objection was the most prominent and forceful response. Bradbury would reply to Chauncy's work with two of his own, in 1769 and 1771. Bradbury and Chauncy inevitably found themselves on opposite political sides of the question of Independence, and Bradbury eventually left America for England in 1775.
EVANS 10853. ESTC W14552. SABIN 12311. BRINLEY SALE 6129.

Price: $750.00