CASPAR HAUSER. AN ACCOUNT OF AN INDIVIDUAL KEPT IN A DUNGEON, SEPARATED FROM ALL COMMUNICATION WITH THE WORLD, FROM EARLY CHILDHOOD TO ABOUT THE AGE OF SEVENTEEN. DRAWN UP FROM LEGAL DOCUMENTS. Translated from the German.

Boston: Allen and Ticknor, 1832. 178pp. 12mo. Dbd. Some pencil marginalia, an occasional fox mark, but generally quite clean internally. About very good. Untrimmed. Item #WRCAM38213

This is apparently the first American printing of the story of Caspar (also spelled Kaspar) Hauser, published a year before his death. Hauser was a foundling who appeared in Nuremberg, Germany, aged about 16 years, in 1828. He claimed to have been raised in isolation in a cell, and his story provoked speculation that he might be of royal lineage, or that he was simply a con artist. His story fascinated many as an example of a child raised in a situation approximating the state of nature. In this text Anselm von Feuerbach, a Bavarian judge, gives his report on Hauser's history and identity. The great German filmmaker, Werner Herzog, made a movie of Hauser's life starring Bruno S., and the Hauser story was also an inspiration for Francois Truffaut's film, THE WILD CHILD. AMERICAN IMPRINTS 12394.

Price: $250.00