OPINIONS RESPECTING THE COMMERCIAL INTERCOURSE BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, AND THE DOMINIONS OF GREAT-BRITAIN, INCLUDING OBSERVATIONS UPON THE NECESSITY AND IMPORTANCE OF AN AMERICAN NAVIGATION ACT. By a Citizen of Massachusetts.

Boston: Samuel Hall, 1797. 61,[1]pp. Half title. Original plain wrappers, string- tied, as issued. Tears along the spine of the wrappers, else fine, untrimmed and unopened. Item #WRCAM36385

Bowdoin criticizes Jay's Treaty, made between the United States and Great Britain in 1795, as conceding too much to the British, and encourages the American government to pass its own "navigation act." In so doing, he joined the chorus of voices, including that of James Madison, calling for retaliatory measures against unfair British trade practices. Bowdoin argues that the United States should stop letting itself be pushed around by the British, to make the choice between being a "great, independent, enterprising and commanding people; - or a weak - dependent - timid and degraded one!" Published anonymously, but attributed to Bowdoin by Evans and Sabin. Bowdoin (1752- 1811) was a prominent Massachusetts merchant and diplomat who ran against the political trend of his region by siding with the Democratic Republican party. Jefferson appointed him the American minister to Spain in 1804. Not in Howes. EVANS 31857. SABIN 7015. ESTC W6694. KRESS B3351.

Price: $750.00