THE OFFERS OF FRANCE EXPLAIN'D.

London: Printed for A. Baldwin, 1712. [2],26pp. Modern half calf over marbled boards, spine gilt. Titlepage lightly soiled, small worm hole through entire text affecting a few letters, otherwise internally clean. A very good copy. Item #WRCAM36197

A pamphlet highly critical of offers made by French representatives at the time that the Treaty of Utrecht was being negotiated. The Treaty of Utrecht, signed in 1713, ended the War of the Spanish Succession (also known as Queen Anne's War). In early 1712 the French and British were negotiating bilaterally, each making demands on the other for concessions, including those regarding territory in North America.

This tract, intensely critical of the entire proposed treaty, includes critiques of the third and fifth articles which relate to American territories, including Hudson Bay, Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland. The author's dissatisfaction with the proposed treaty is expressed in the first paragraph:

"If I may judg[e] by myself, 'tis impossible to express the surprize, indignation, and concern, which the offers of France for a general peace must have rais'd in the breast of every true Englishman. Is this the good peace we have been made to expect? Are these the fruits of a successful war? Is this the provision made for the safety of our allies?...This the security for Great Britain? Is this reducing the exorbitant power of France, and preserving the liberty of Europe?"
EUROPEAN AMERICANA 712/164. KRESS S2596. GOLDSMITHS 4968.

Price: $1,500.00