EL GOBERNADOR DEL DEPARTAMENTO DE PUEBLA, A SUS HABITANTES. CONCIUDADANOS: COLOCADO POR EL SUPREMO GOBIERNO AL FRENTE DE VUESTROS NEGOCIOS, HOY HE TOMADO POSESION DEL CARGO DE GOBERNADOR, PRESTANDO EL DEBIDO JURAMENTO ANTE LA JUNTA DEPARTAMENTAL...[caption title and beginning of text].

Puebla, Mx. Imprenta del Gobierno, July 23, 1836. Letterpress broadside, approximately 16 3/4 x 12 inches. Printed in Spanish in two columns. Old folds, short closed tear in bottom margin. Small portion of left margin clipped to allow for folding into a binding, a few small stab- holes. Near fine. Item #WRCAM55001

An exceedingly rare, perhaps unique, Mexican broadside calling for Mexican unity in the face of losing the Texas Revolution. This proclamation was issued by Pueblan governor José Antonio Mozo just four months after the Fall of the Alamo and three months after the disastrous Mexican defeat at the Battle of San Jacinto. Here, Mozo reminds the Mexican people of their solidarity in the throwing-off of Spanish colonial rule in 1821, and calling for a renewed effort against the rebels of Texas. A rough translation of the document reads, in part: "Things have not gone smoothly since we Mexicans won our independence in 1821, mostly because of political infighting....We put aside our differences until the Spanish invaders were expelled. This is what we should have expected when the rebels from Texas took over one of our most fertile states. At first, while our Army was beating the rebel colonists, everyone was doing their duty. However, the moment General Santa Anna was taken prisoner, rebel agents cropped up inside the country, and even among its own children....They have already suffered the punishment they deserve, and the same fate must wait for those who imitate their example. No, there must not be many who, after the terrible lesson they received, dare to support their perfidious handling; but independence is always in danger, as long as we did not reconquer the Department of Texas, and those who make war there, have continued to use themselves, to disturb the inner tranquility, the evil of some and the simplicity of others. The Government will mobilize all its resources against the rebels, but the Government needs the cooperation of the inhabitants of the republic. Give it to us, for the part that touches you: forget old resentments: let us remember that we are Mexican; and recovering this name all its magic and its prestige, serve to unite the wills and so that the nation becomes as respectable today, as it was in 1821, and while its children were not divided into sides." Though the Treaties of Velasco - one public document and one secret treaty - were signed on May 14, 1836 and essentially gave birth to the Republic of Texas, the question of Texas independence in the eyes of most Mexican officials was not remotely settled. The government of Mexico refused to recognize the public treaty, claiming that Santa Anna was not authorized to agree to its terms; in fact, Santa Anna did not have the power to sign such a treaty under the Mexican Constitution. Further, Santa Anna claimed that he signed the treaty under coercion, as a prisoner, and therefore the treaties were null. Despite these claims by Mexican authorities, their generals continued to pull back the demoralized Mexican Army through mid-June of 1836, when the last of the defeated Mexican troops arrived in Matomoros. Almost immediately, as evidenced from the present broadside, Mexican officials called for a renewed effort to reclaim Texas. In the end, though, Mexico's government and military were simply too weak to attempt any further incursions into the new republic. A decade of more-of-the-same political infighting mentioned here drew focus away from recapturing Texas, and soon Mexico found itself with a new enemy - the United States. It was only after losing the Mexican-American War that Mexico officially recognized both the independence of Texas and its annexation by the United States in the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. An early example of the renewed call for further Mexican action against the rebels of the Texas Revolution. Not in Streeter Texas, OCLC, or any reference known to us.

Price: $3,500.00

Calling for Mexican Unity and Resolve in the Aftermath of Texan Independence