MEMORIAL OF THE DIRECTORS OF THE NEW ENGLAND MISSISSIPPI LAND COMPANY, CITIZENS OF THE STATE OF MASSACHUSETTS. JANUARY 28, 1814. PRINTED BY ORDER OF THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES.

Washington: Roger C. Weightman, 1814. 20pp. Printed self-wrappers, stitched. Very light foxing and toning to outer leaves, else near fine, untrimmed and unopened. Item #WRCAM38134

A summary of the arguments of the New England Mississippi Land Company to their rights in the Yazoo lands, printed for the use of the United States Senate. In the late 18th century, land companies were formed for the purpose of buying vast tracts of land in the western portion of Georgia, named the "Yazoo lands" after the river that flowed through the region. These companies planned to resell the land at tremendous profits. In January 1795, the Yazoo Act, which transferred thirty-five million acres in present-day Mississippi and Alabama to four companies for $500,000, was signed by Georgia governor George Mathews. Despite charges of corruption and popular opposition, the Yazoo companies were able to purchase the lands. In response to continued opposition in Georgia to the act, a Rescinding Act was passed in 1796 and in 1798 a revision of the state constitution was enacted. Finally, in 1802, the land and the claims were transferred to the U.S. government in exchange for $1.25 million paid to the state of Georgia. The federal government would continue to receive claims and requests for payment from various speculators, such as this memorial from the New England Mississippi Land Company, for many years. SHAW & SHOEMAKER 33299. EBERSTADT 133:456.

Price: $100.00